ConcreteBoard

Advanced search

News:

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: #16 - Norm Snead  (Read 3863 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Fan_Since_64

  • Inept Security Guard
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3313
  • Grumpy Old Eagles Historian
#16 - Norm Snead
« on: June 04, 2009, 08:21:43 PM »



#16
Norm Snead


At #16 on the Greatest Eagles by the Numbers list is a quarterback who Philadelphia fans in the ‘60s had a tempestuous relationship with, Norm Snead.

Norm played for the Eagles from 1964 thru 1970, having been acquired from Washington along with DB Claude Crabb in the celebrated trade for QB Sonny Jurgensen and DB Jimmy Carr. He had been the taterskins’ 1st draft pick in 1961 out of Wake Forest, and was the first rookie quarterback in NFL history to start all of his team’s games. The Skins were terrible (1-12-1) and he took a beating, but at 6’4” and 215 pounds, he was a big quarterback with a strong arm and was considered to be an excellent prospect. It appeared that his potential might be realized early when the taterskins got off to a 4-0-2 start in 1962, thanks to the acquisition of Bobby Mitchell from the Cleveland Browns, who was converted from halfback to flanker and teamed with Snead to create an exciting passing tandem. However, an injury to Mitchell, combined with double and triple coverages by opposing defenses, led to a 1-7 finish and the controversy began to develop between those who viewed Snead as a star quarterback in the making and those who believed he had already progressed as far as his limitations (most significantly, a slow release combined with lack of mobility) would allow. While Norm made it to the Pro Bowl after the 1962 and ’63 seasons, he also led the NFL in 1963 with 27 interceptions.

He came to the Eagles as part of Head Coach/GM Joe Kuharich’s rebuilding program in ’64, the quarterback that he would build an offense around. The results were mixed in Norm’s first season in Philadelphia – for the first time in his career, he threw more TD passes (14) than interceptions (12), but he also completed less than half of his passes (48.8 ) for the third of four seasons and had otherwise ordinary numbers. He played well in the season opening 38-7 win over the Giants and had a 301-yard, three TD performance in the season ending 36-34 loss to the Cardinals at St. Louis. But in between, he was prone to being erratic and was relieved at points during the season by both of his backups, King Hill and Jack Concannon, setting the stage for controversy (not helped by Coach Kuharich’s insistence that all three were starting quarterbacks).

Snead opened the 1965 season with a solid showing in a 34-27 win over the Cardinals at Franklin Field, with 267 yards passing and two TDs, including the game winner, a well-thrown 38-yard pass to a well-covered WR Ray Poage in the corner of the end zone. He suffered a knee injury two weeks later against the Browns that kept him out of four games (and required surgery after the season), but came back strong with three 300-yard passing performances (including an Eagles career high of 362, with 3 TD passes, at Cleveland). His 8.15 yards per pass attempt ranked fourth in the league and he significantly improved his completion percentage (52.1) and passer rating (78.0). Norm was rewarded with a trip to the Pro Bowl following the season.

After the solid performance in ’65, the 1966 season was a major reversal for Snead. The team got off to a 2-1 start, but then lost to the Cardinals and Cowboys by a combined score of 97-17. Norm threw five interceptions in the 41-10 loss at home against St. Louis and then completed just 9 of 22 pass attempts for 110 yards before being pulled in an embarrassing 56-7 debacle at Dallas. While the team bounced back, Norm found himself on the bench by mid November as Hill and Concannon led the Birds to a 9-5 record. For the season, he failed to reach double figures in TD passes for the first time in his career (8 ), and had a career-low completion percentage of 45.6 while his passer rating plummeted to 55.1.

With Concannon traded in the off-season and King Hill lost to a hand injury in the preseason, Norm bounced back with his most statistically impressive year with the Eagles in 1967, establishing career highs in pass attempts (434), completions (240), yards (3399), and TD passes (29). His 55.3 completion percentage was his best with the Birds and ranked third in the NFL (along with the passing yards). His 7.83 yards per pass attempt ranked fourth. Unfortunately, he was also sacked 49 times and threw 24 interceptions. Along the way, he had three 300-yard passing performances and three games in which he threw four TD passes (in one, against the expansion New Orleans Saints, he did both) and benefited greatly from the emergence of second-year WR Ben Hawkins as a major deep threat.

Norm suffered a broken leg on the first play of the first preseason game of 1968, which kept him out until the fourth contest of the regular season. He was rusty upon his return to the lineup, throwing four interceptions (against one TD pass) in his first game back at Washington and four more (with just 52 passing yards) in the following game at Dallas. The team suffered through a dreadful 2-12 season and Snead led the NFL by throwing 21 INTs. Next to Coach Kuharich, he was the chief target of booing from the frustrated Eagles fans.

The Eagles were a transformed team in 1969, with a new owner (Leonard Tose), GM (Pete Retzlaff), and head coach (Jerry Williams). It was still Snead at QB, and in the second game of the season against Pittsburgh he threw for a career-high five TD passes (four of them to Hawkins and one to newly-acquired WR Harold Jackson) and 335 yards in a 41-27 win. Unfortunately, it was not a sign of better things to come – Norm continued to be inconsistent and again led the league in interceptions thrown with 23 while barely completing half of his passes (50.1). 1970 was not much better, and his seven-season reign as Eagles starting QB came to an end in the ensuing off-season; he was traded to the Minnesota Vikings for OT Steve Smith and three draft picks.

In 1972 Norm moved on to the New York Giants and had perhaps his greatest season as a pro, leading the NFC in passing and earning a final trip to the Pro Bowl. After a less stellar performance in ’73 (in keeping with his boom-and-bust cycle), Snead lost his starting job and was traded to San Francisco during the 1974 season. He returned to the Giants in ’76, where his long career finally came to a close. At the time of his retirement, he had thrown 257 interceptions, the third most in NFL history up to that point. In spite of any accomplishments during his career (he passed for 30,797 yards and 196 TDs), it is the interceptions that he is most remembered for.

For his career with the Eagles, Snead completed 1154 of 2236 pass attempts for 15,672 yards and 111 TDs, which all rank fourth in franchise history. His 124 career interceptions rank second. His completion percentage was 51.6 % and his overall passer rating 67.7 while he averaged 7.0 yards per attempt. Norm’s won-lost record as starting QB was 28-49-3. He twice threw TD passes of 87 yards – to RB Timmy Brown vs. Pittsburgh in 1964 and to Ben Hawkins against the Cardinals in ’67. Altogether, Snead had eight 300-yard passing performances for the Eagles, with his high the 362 at Cleveland in 1965.

Norm was not a mobile quarterback, particularly after the knee injury in 1965 and the broken leg in ‘68. His best rushing total for the Eagles was 81 yards on 24 carries (3.4 avg.) with 3 TDs in 1965 and he had a long gain of 21 yards in 1967. Snead had 99 carries for 266 yards (a 2.7 average) while scoring 13 rushing touchdowns during his time in Philadelphia.

To say that Norm’s career in Philadelphia was a rollercoaster ride is putting it mildly. He showed tantalizing glimmers of ability, and in any given game, or series, could look tremendous…and then abysmal in the next game or series. It didn’t help that Sonny Jurgensen was breaking passing records in Washington, Joe Kuharich was becoming detested in Philadelphia, and an exciting quarterback like Jack Concannon was waiting in the wings for the first three seasons.

The burning question, both during his playing days and since, was how successful Norm’s career might have been had he had both better coaching and personnel around him. There were those who steadfastly believed he might have been a big winner with a stronger team; he had the arm and ability, and again, on any given day he could be outstanding.

But there was always that inevitable downside, punctuated by sacks, interceptions, and mental lapses. He epitomized much of what was both right and wrong with the Eagles during the Kuharich and Williams coaching eras, and will forever remain something of a frustrating puzzle for Eagles fans of that time.

Norm Snead’s career passing record with the Eagles:

Year
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
G
12
11
10
14
11
13
14
Att.
283
288
226
434
291
379
335
Comp.
138
150
103
240
152
190
181
Pct.
48.8 
52.1 
45.6
55.3
52.2
50.1
54.0 
Yds.
1906
2346
1275
3399
1655
2768
2323
YPA
6.73
8.15
5.64
7.83
5.69
7.30
6.93
TD
14
15
8
29
11
19
15
INT
12
13
11
24
21
23
20
Logged

Fan_Since_64

  • Inept Security Guard
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3313
  • Grumpy Old Eagles Historian
Re: #16 - Norm Snead
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2009, 08:29:09 PM »

Other Eagles who wore #16:

Harry O'Boyle (Blocking Back/DB, 1933)
Sylvester Davis (TB/FB/DB, 1933)
James Zyntell (G, 1935)
John Kusko (Blocking Back/TB/DB, 1937-38)
Elmer Kolberg (OE/HB/DB, 1940)
Vern Davis (DB, 1971)
Horst Muhlmann (PK, 1975-77 - the runner-up)
Rob Hertel (QB, 1980)
Jeff Kemp (QB, 1991)
Gari Scott (WR, 2000)
Justin Jenkins (WR, 2005)
« Last Edit: June 04, 2009, 08:39:00 PM by Fan_Since_64 »
Logged

ice grillin you

  • Dunning–Kruger in effect.
  • Inept Security Guard
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 97955
Re: #16 - Norm Snead
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2009, 09:03:31 PM »

holy shtein a face mask!
Logged
i can take a phrase thats rarely heard...flip it....now its a daily word

igy gettin it done like warrick

im the board pharmacist....always one step above yous

"gold standard" = "mission accomplished"

SD_Eagle5

  • Guest
Re: #16 - Norm Snead
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2009, 09:31:04 PM »

Looks like Sean Landetta
Logged

Sgt PSN

  • 2005 Keeper League Champ
  • Inept Security Guard
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 45683
  • Certified Losers
Re: #16 - Norm Snead
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2009, 09:19:09 AM »

Other Eagles who wore #16:

Harry O'Boyle (Blocking Back/DB, 1933)
Sylvester Davis (TB/FB/DB, 1933)

James Zyntell (G, 1935)
John Kusko (Blocking Back/TB/DB, 1937-38)
Elmer Kolberg (OE/HB/DB, 1940)
Vern Davis (DB, 1971)
Horst Muhlmann (PK, 1975-77 - the runner-up)
Rob Hertel (QB, 1980)
Jeff Kemp (QB, 1991)
Gari Scott (WR, 2000)
Justin Jenkins (WR, 2005)

2 players with the same number during the same year?  typo or was there just nothing in the rules back then that limited a number to just one player? 

good job as always on the write up.  :yay
Logged

Fan_Since_64

  • Inept Security Guard
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3313
  • Grumpy Old Eagles Historian
Re: #16 - Norm Snead
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2009, 11:16:13 AM »

Hey Sarge, I had noticed that and double checked. It isn't a typo - I'm guessing that O'Boyle didn't last the season and Davis joined the team and took his number.

And thanks, Norm Snead was the first Eagles QB I ever watched play (and booed, although I might well have booed King Hill first), so I put a little something extra into his profile.  ;)
« Last Edit: June 05, 2009, 11:18:47 AM by Fan_Since_64 »
Logged

Diomedes

  • Resident Iconoclast
  • Inept Security Guard
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 32382
Re: #16 - Norm Snead
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2009, 10:37:54 PM »

I'm enjoying this series.
Logged

fansince61

  • 2005 Suicide Playoffs Champ
  • Inept Security Guard
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2220
  • And my Axe!!
Re: #16 - Norm Snead
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2009, 11:53:36 AM »

The mental lapses..the mental lapses...mental lapes :-D :-D :-D
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up