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Fan_Since_64

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#7 - Ron Jaworski
« on: April 03, 2009, 11:25:49 PM »



#7
Ron Jaworski


The Greatest Eagle by the Numbers at #7 is one of the most durable and successful quarterbacks in the team’s history, Ron Jaworski, who played for the Eagles from 1977 thru 1986.

Jaws was drafted in the 2nd round by the Los Angeles Rams in 1973 out of Youngstown State. He saw limited action during his time in LA, trapped in a crowd at QB that included John Hadl, James Harris, and Pat Haden. Thanks to injuries, Ron did get an opportunity to start in the 1975 postseason, leading the Rams to a win over the St. Louis Cardinals in the NFC Divisional playoff. Unhappy at the lack of playing time, he rejected the front office’s offer of a contract extension, indicating that he would play out his option and sign elsewhere, and his rights were traded to the Eagles after the ’76 season for TE Charle Young. He became the quarterback that Head Coach Dick Vermeil sought to build a championship team around.

Jaworski took his lumps during a 5-9 season in 1977. While things got off to a good start with a 13-3 win in the season opening game vs. Tampa Bay, the Birds proceeded to lose nine of the next eleven contests. Jaws was sacked 47 times, including eight times in a game at New England. He also threw an NFC-leading 21 interceptions (against 18 TDs). But the season ended on a high note, with consecutive wins over the Giants and Jets. And Vermeil made clear that he would stand by his young quarterback, win or lose.

Coach Vermeil’s confidence in Jaworski began to pay off in 1978, when the Eagles qualified for an NFC wild card berth with a 9-7 record – their first meaningful postseason appearance since the 1960 championship season – and 1979, when they attained a better record (11-5) and second wild card berth; they also went a game deeper into the postseason. The Polish Rifle progressed along with the team, with his passer rating improving on that of his 60.4 in 1977 to 67.9 in ’78 and 76.8 in ’79. His yardage totals also steadily climbed from 2183 to 2487 to 2669. In 1979, for the first time, he threw more touchdowns (18) than interceptions (12).

Ron’s steady improvement each year culminated in a 1980 season in which the Eagles went to the Super Bowl and Jaworski led the NFC in passing (91.0). Never much more than a fifty percent passer in his first three seasons in Philadelphia, his completion percentage jumped to 57.0. He achieved career highs in completions (257), yards (3529), yards per attempt (7.82), and TD passes (27). Along the way, he also had his first two 300-yard passing performances – 323 in a win at New Orleans, and 331 in the season-ending loss at Dallas. The Polish Rifle received individual honors that included a trip to the Pro Bowl and Maxwell Club and UPI Player of the Year honors.

The postseason ended with a thud, however, as Jaworski and the Eagles looked anything but super against the Oakland Raiders in the Super Bowl; Jaws completed just 18 of 38 passes, with a TD and three interceptions (all by LB Rod Martin), and the offense in general looked confused and out-of-sync throughout an agonizing game.

The Eagles started off strong in 1981, winning the first six games, but went 4-6 the rest of the way and made an early exit in the playoffs. For the first time in the Vermeil – and Jaworski – eras, the team took a step backward and Ron’s numbers reflected the downward trend during the season; interceptions were back up (20, including four in one game at Dallas) and the passer rating down (73.8 ). Jaws started off the ’82 season with consecutive 300-yard passing efforts, in a 37-34 loss to the taterskins at the Vet and a 24-21 win at Cleveland, but then the player’s strike shut down the season until November. Afterward, the offense was inconsistent, the Birds finished up at 3-6, and Coach Vermeil left the team. Statistically, while Ron achieved a career-high 58.4 completion percentage, his interceptions also matched his TDs at 12 apiece.

The next three seasons were frustrating ones for the Eagles, marked by turmoil in the front office that rippled through the coaching staff and to the team on the field. Jaworski had seven 300-yard passing games during the period from 1983-85, but only one of those games ended up being a win for the Eagles (a 16-14 victory over Dallas in 1985 in which the Polish Rifle fired for 380 yards). Dependable offensive weapons such as RB Wilbert Montgomery and WR Harold Carmichael broke down or dropped away, but Jaworski remained a constant until he suffered a broken leg late in the 1984 season, after 116 consecutive starts. It certainly wasn’t all bad: Ron tied a NFL record with a 99-yard scoring pass to WR Mike Quick against the Falcons in ’85, and threw a 90-yarder to Quick in 1984 vs. the Cardinals. In ’84, the Eagles had three receivers catch 60 passes in a season for the first time in franchise history (Quick, Montgomery, and TE John Spagnola, who led the group with 65).

Still, by the end of Marion Campbell’s coaching tenure and the beginning of Buddy Ryan’s in 1986, it was becoming apparent that Jaworski’s days were numbered in Philadelphia. Jaws had taken a brutal beating in the ’85 season opener against the Giants, being sacked seven times, and finally replaced by rookie Randall Cunningham late in the game; the next week, Jaws was benched in favor of the rookie, who provided plenty of excitement – and breathtaking mobility – but was too raw to hold down the starting job. Ron ended up starting 12 games in all, and started 9 more in ’86 while Cunningham was given more playing time (and reserve Matt Cavanaugh, brought in from San Francisco to provide additional insurance at QB, started two games as well). The finest performance of his last season with the Birds came, fittingly enough, over his original team, the Rams, in a Week 4 contest in which he completed 17 of 27 passes for 213 yards and three TDs.

The Polish Rifle stopped firing for the Eagles after the ’86 season – he was not offered a new contract and signed as a free agent with Miami, finishing his career with Kansas City in 1989.

Ron left holding many lifetime passing records for the Eagles, and currently ranks second in attempts (3918), completions (2088), yardage (26,963), and TD passes (175). He still holds the record for career interceptions, with 151, although in fairness most of those came in seasons when the team around him was relatively weak. His lifetime passer rating was 74.0, and he averaged 6.88 yards per attempt with a completion percentage of 53.3 and an INT percentage of 3.9. Jaws had twelve 300-yard passing performances for the Eagles, with a high of 394 vs. San Francisco in 1985. The team’s overall won-lost record during his starts was 69-67-1.

A fairly mobile quarterback, Ron had 232 rushing attempts for 772 yards (a 3.3-yard average) and 12 TDs. His season high was 129 yards on 25 carries in 1983, for a healthy 5.2 average.

In the postseason, Ron ranks second in team playoff history with 225 passing attempts and 9 TD passes, including three in one game against the Chicago Bears in the Wild Card playoff following the 1979 season (which ties him with Rodney Peete and Donovan McNabb for the most TD passes for the Eagles in a postseason game), one of which was Jaworski’s longest postseason pass play - a completion to RB Billy Campfield that covered 63 yards. His 103 completions and 1319 yards through the air rank third all-time. Jaworski’s high for yards through the air in the playoffs was 291 in the Super Bowl XV loss against the Raiders. He directed some memorable wins for the Birds, most notably the NFC Championship game win over Dallas following the ’80 season, but looked less than legendary in some heartbreaking defeats.

On the ground in his seven postseason games, the totals were pretty modest – 14 attempts for 31 yards and no TDs, with a high of 20 yards on three carries against the Bears in ’79.

Ron Jaworski may not have had the athletic skills of a Randall Cunningham or Donovan McNabb, but he came across as a gritty, determined quarterback who made the most of his abilities and provided enthusiastic and effective team leadership, through good times and bad. He was made a member of the Eagles Honor Roll in 1992.

Ron Jaworski’s career record with the Eagles:

PASSING

Year
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
G
14
16
16
16
16
9
16
13
16
10
Att.
346
398
374
451
461
286
446
427
484
245
Comp.
166
206
190
257
250
167
235
234
255
128
Pct.
48.0 
51.8 
50.8
57.0
54.2
58.4
52.7
54.8
52.7
52.2 
Yds.
2183
2487
2669
3529
3095
2076
3315
2754
3450
1405
YPA
6.31
6.25
7.14
7.82
6.71
7.26
7.43
6.45
7.13
5.73
TD
18
16
18
27
23
12
20
16
17
8
INT
21
16
12
12
20
12
18
14
20
6

RUSHING

Year
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
G
14
16
16
16
16
9
16
13
16
10
Att.
40
30
43
27
22
10
25
5
17
13     
Yds.
127
79
119
95
128
9
129
18
35
33
Avg.
3.2   
2.6   
2.8
3.5
5.8
0.9
5.2
3.6
2.1
2.5   
TD
5
0
2
1
0
0
1
1
2
0

« Last Edit: April 05, 2009, 03:01:22 PM by Fan_Since_64 »
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Fan_Since_64

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Re: #7 - Ron Jaworski
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2009, 11:42:33 PM »

Other Eagles who wore #7:

Roy Zimmerman (QB/DB, 1943-46 - the runner-up)
John Huarte (QB, 1968)
Jim Ward (QB, 1971-72)
John Reaves (QB, 1973-74)
Roger Ruzek (PK, 1989-93)
Ken O'Brien (QB, 1993)
Bobby Hoying (QB, 1996-98)
Sean Landeta (P, 1999-2002)
Jeff Garcia (QB, 2006)
Michael Vick (QB, 2009)
« Last Edit: October 07, 2009, 07:36:58 PM by Fan_Since_64 »
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shorebird

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Re: #7 - Ron Jaworski
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2009, 09:17:32 AM »

I've always liked Jaws, and consider him one of the best analyst on ESPN. Also, I can't help but say how much I like reading '64's stuff. It's better than most anything else about the Eagles that you can find on the web. Most of the players he's writing about, he's actually seen in action, unlike a lot of us here who haven't been around as long.
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QB Eagles

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Re: #7 - Ron Jaworski
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2009, 09:26:04 AM »

There's only one person who disapproves of the choice.

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Fan_Since_64

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Re: #7 - Ron Jaworski
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2009, 10:38:11 AM »

I've always liked Jaws, and consider him one of the best analyst on ESPN. Also, I can't help but say how much I like reading '64's stuff. It's better than most anything else about the Eagles that you can find on the web. Most of the players he's writing about, he's actually seen in action, unlike a lot of us here who haven't been around as long.

Thanks shorebird, although I had to laugh because the player coming up at #8 was most definitely from before my time.  ;)

I always liked Jaws, too, and agree with you that he's a very good tv analyst.  8)
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PoopyfaceMcGee

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Re: #7 - Ron Jaworski
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2009, 12:37:12 PM »

There's only one person who disapproves of the choice.



farging scarey.
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Tomahawk

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Re: #7 - Ron Jaworski
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2009, 12:49:35 PM »

I've always liked Jaws, and consider him one of the best analyst on ESPN. Also, I can't help but say how much I like reading '64's stuff. It's better than most anything else about the Eagles that you can find on the web. Most of the players he's writing about, he's actually seen in action, unlike a lot of us here who haven't been around as long.

Thanks shorebird, although I had to laugh because the player coming up at #8 was most definitely from before my time.  ;)

I always liked Jaws, too, and agree with you that he's a very good tv analyst.  8)

Plus, he's as much an Eagles homer as Hoge is hater
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shorebird

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Re: #7 - Ron Jaworski
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2009, 08:03:43 PM »

Can we list Vick as one of the other Eagles who wore no. 7?
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Sgt PSN

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Re: #7 - Ron Jaworski
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2009, 08:18:35 PM »

technically, no.  not until he suits up for a regular season game.
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Fan_Since_64

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Re: #7 - Ron Jaworski
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2009, 08:47:56 PM »

Can we list Vick as one of the other Eagles who wore no. 7?

Don't worry, I'll update the numbers lists when the time comes.  ;)
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phillycrew

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Re: #7 - Ron Jaworski
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2009, 01:53:11 PM »

Can we list Vick as one of the other Eagles who wore no. 7?

Don't worry, I'll update the numbers lists when the time comes.  ;)

Vick is waiting patiently.  Personally, I would not list him with Jaws since he is really more of a RB.
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